Category Archives: New publication

Article on the promise of whole-body dynamic PET

Our efforts to translate the concept of dynamic whole-body imaging to the clinical arena are taking notice, as seen in this web article: “A clinical take on whole-body dynamic PET”. Our very own Nicolas Karakatsanis, who initiated these efforts as a post-doc in the lab, then pursued efforts in Geneva at the Zaidi Lab, and now at Mt Sinai, recently published the promising results of combining this novel acquisition protocol with advanced 4D image reconstruction to achieve improved quantitative imaging. Through our ongoing, close collaborations with Siemens Medical Solution, we are very optimistic about future implementation and promise of this framework.

A race effect on amyloid deposition?

Our recent publication in the journal Neurology has been accompanied by a nice editorial reviewing and discussing the novel finding. This work involved recruitment of subjects from the longitudinal Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, for  an additional PET scan to visualize amyloid in the brain, which has been a major breakthrough in the field of Alzheimer disease (AD). The resulting ARIC-PET amyloid imaging study revealed for the first time that black subjects depicted higher amyloid levels, even after adjustment for demographics, vascular risk factors, and cognitive status, making the provocative suggestion that there might be race differences in the process of amyloid deposition.

The analysis itself was stimulated by reports of increased prevalence of AD in black compared to white individuals. In this major NIH funded effort (PI: Gottesman), extensive site travel, quality assurance and quantitative analysis was performed by Chief Physicist Dr. Rahmim for data obtained from the three PET imaging sites (Washington County, MD; Jackson, MS; and Forsyth County, NC).

 

Why you can’t stop checking your phone?

Here’s a concise and helpful overview (by the Johns Hopkins Magazine) of the recent finding in our paper, “The Role of Dopamine in Value-Based Attentional Orienting.”

Quantitative Tomography Lab

Over the past years we have devoted significant efforts to implement routine, systematic motion compensation for  brain PET studies at our center. The following work, just published in Current Biology (led by our collaborator, the late Dr. Yantis), was only able to arrive at significant correlations between value-based distraction and PET-measured dopamine release after inclusion of motion compensation. We are quite motivated by these positive findings.

B. A. Anderson, H. Kuwabara, D. F. Wong, E. G. Gean, A. Rahmim, J R. Brasic , N. George, B. Frolov, S. M. Courtney, and S. Yantis
The role of dopamine in value-based attentional orienting
Current Biology, vol. 26, pp. 550-555, 2016.

View original post

Motion correction framework at Hopkins resulted in significant findings

Over the past years we have devoted significant efforts to implement routine, systematic motion compensation for  brain PET studies at our center. The following work, just published in Current Biology (led by our collaborator, the late Dr. Yantis), was only able to arrive at significant correlations between value-based distraction and PET-measured dopamine release after inclusion of motion compensation. We are quite motivated by these positive findings.

B. A. Anderson, H. Kuwabara, D. F. Wong, E. G. Gean, A. Rahmim, J R. Brasic , N. George, B. Frolov, S. M. Courtney, and S. Yantis
The role of dopamine in value-based attentional orienting
Current Biology, vol. 26, pp. 550-555, 2016.

Review of resolution modeling in PET

Our comprehensive review of resolution modeling in PET has been published:

A. Rahmim, J. Qi, and V. Sossi
Resolution modeling in PET imaging: theory, practice, benefits, and pitfalls
Med. Phys., vol. 40, pp. 064301, 2013.

I learnt more in the process of writing this than I could have imagined! It’s already generating very interesting discussions, and we’re in talks with various individuals, including at Siemens, about interesting future directions.