Category Archives: Uncategorized

Our lab is moving to Canada!

After 13 years at Johns Hopkins University, our lab is moving to Vancouver in July! Our lab will be jointly affiliated with the Departments of Radiology and Physics & Astronomy at the University of British Columbia (UBC), as well as the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA). We look forward to playing an active role in concerted and integrated efforts to improve research, education and clinical practice at UBC and BCCA. Hopkins, as an amazing institute and community, has been extremely gracious to us, to which we’re indebted, and we surely hope and plan to pursue significant collaborations and joint efforts.

Parametric PET imaging is finally a product!

Finally, there is a vendor product (FlowMotion Multiparametric PET by Siemens) that enables dynamic whole-body PET including parametric imaging. This is very rewarding given that our group was the earliest to propose and work on this framework, including close collaboration with Siemens. This is clearly an enabling technology, and it remains to be seen whether it will add significant value to routine clinical imaging. Hopefully more and more centers will try and explore potential benefits from this technology.

Saeed Ashrafinia awarded the 2018 Bradley-Alavi Student Fellowship

Congratulations to Saeed Ashrafinia who has been awarded the 2018 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) Bradley-Alavi Student Fellowship!

Saeed, an Electrical & Computer Engineering PhD candidate in the lab, is actively pursuing research in quantitative PET and SPECT imaging. The awarded fellowship, entitled, “Radiomics Analysis of Clinical Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Images to Identify Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease” proposes to translate radiomics analyses (which has been largely absent in SPECT) to the domain of clinical cardiac imaging.

Bradley-Alavi Fellows are named in honor of the late Stanley E. Bradley, Professor of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and a prominent researcher in the fields of renal physiology and liver disease, and Abass Alavi, M.D., Professor and Director of Research Education at the Department of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania.

New Book Finally Published!

Our book has now been finally published: “Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics” (Paperback)

cover

Authors: Ramesh Chandra and Arman Rahmim
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer (Nov. 2017; Philadelphia, PA)
Edition: 8th

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Overview: Part of the renowned The Basics series of medical physics books, and originally authored by Dr. Chandra decades ago, this has been a classic text for nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and radiology residents, fellows and practitioners, medical physicists and radiologic technologists. This newly co-authored effort has lead to a substantially updated and expanded 8th edition.

The book covers a wide range of topics on radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals, in vitro and in vivo detection, radiation dosimetry/risk/regulations, imaging devices (gamma camera, SPECT, PET), quality assurance, image reconstruction/processing, etc., with 18 chapters:

  1. Basic Review
  2. Nuclides and Radioactive Processes
  3. Radioactivity: Law of Decay, Half-Life, and Statistics
  4. Production of Radionuclides
  5. Radiopharmaceuticals
  6. Interaction of High-Energy Radiation with Matter
  7. Radiation Dosimetry
  8. Detection of High-Energy Radiation
  9. In Vitro Radiation Detection
  10. In Vivo Radiation Detection: Basic Problems, Probes, and Scintillation Camera
  11. Computer Interfacing and Image Processing
  12. Operational Characteristics and Quality Control of a Scintillation Camera
  13. Emission computed tomography (ECT), General Principles
  14. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)
  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)
  16. Detectability or Final Contrast in an Image
  17. Biological Effects of Radiation and Risk Evaluation from Radiation Exposure
  18. Methods of Safe Handling of Radionuclides and Pertaining Rules and Regulations

New funding towards improved amyloid and tau PET imaging

We are pleased to have secured funding (NIH R21) towards advanced image generation for amyloid & tau PET scans. The grant, entitled “Partial Volume Correction Methods to Improve Quantitation and Interpretation of Amyloid & Tau PET Imaging in Aging and Dementia”, seeks to develop and apply state-of-the-art image generation methods, and thoroughly assess their performance in ongoing clinical and longitudinal studies.